1. Stanford study examines how COVID-19 infection impacts brain, memory  Click On Detroit | Local 4 | WDIV
  2. Covid reinfections 'to be expected' as virus spreads, say government scientists  The Guardian
  3. New Blood Test Accurately Predicts Which COVID-19 Patients Will Develop Severe Infection  SciTechDaily
  4. Long COVID 'May Be Four Syndromes'  WebMD
  5. What We Know And Don't Know About COVID-19 Reinfection Cases  ScienceAlert
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Test could inform doctors on best treatment options. Scientists have developed, for the first time, a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of Covid-19. The study, led by researchers at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences, is published in The Lan

New Blood Test Accurately Predicts Which COVID-19 Patients Will Develop Severe Infection

Two new studies published this week suggest that the risk of being infected with the novel coronavirus might be linked to one's blood type. One study showed that those with Type O blood were less likely to catch COVID-19, while the other showed that those with Type O blood didn't get as sick.Two new studies published this week suggest that the risk of being infected with the novel coronavirus might be linked to one’s blood type. One study showed that those with Type O blood were …

New studies reveal something strange that could affect your coronavirus risk – BGR

The condition commonly called 'long COVID' may not be one syndrome but possibly up to four, according to a new review.The condition commonly called 'long COVID' may not be one syndrome but possibly up to four, according to a new review.

Long COVID 'May Be Four Syndromes'

Leading doctors warn that intensive care beds are filling up and the pandemic spreads Leading doctors warn that intensive care beds are filling up and the pandemic spreads

Covid-19 medics 'extremely worried' about impact of second wave on hospitals - Hull Live

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Experts from Canada studied the blood of recovering coronavirus patients, finding that the extent of the immune defences drop 6-10 weeks after their first symptoms.Experts from Canada studied the blood of recovering coronavirus patients, finding that the extent of the immune defences drop 6-10 weeks after their first symptoms.

COVID-19: antibodies in the blood of patients fade rapidly after symptoms subside, study finds | Daily Mail Online

Bloomberg - Are you a robot?

Two new studies suggest a link between people with type O blood and a decreased chance of contracting COVID-19, as well as milder symptoms for those who do.Two new studies suggest a link between people with type O blood and a decreased chance of contracting COVID-19, as well as milder symptoms for those who do.

People with blood type O may be less at risk from COVID-19, new studies find | 8News

In the absence of approved, effective treatments for COVID-19, some hospitals have been treating patients with severe COVID symptoms with blood plasma from recovering patients. The blood of recovered ...

In recovering COVID-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly

SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients plummet quickly after symptoms disappear.SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients plummet quickly after symptoms disappear.

Researchers Just Found That Antibody Levels Decline Soon After Coronavirus Symptoms End

People with the same blood type might not suffer from severe illness, eitherPeople with the same blood type might not suffer from severe illness, either

Coronavirus: Is blood type O bad for COVID-19? - Deseret News

As President Trump claims that he is immune to COVID-19 and isolated reports emerge of reinfection, what is the truth about immunity to COVID-19?As President Trump claims that he is immune to COVID-19 and isolated reports emerge of reinfection, what is the truth about immunity to COVID-19?

What We Know And Don't Know About COVID-19 Reinfection Cases

More evidence show link between blood type and coronavirus riskMore evidence show link between blood type and coronavirus risk

People with blood type O may face lower risk of coronavirus infection or have milder symptoms

Where people live and the jobs they do are more likely to explain the differences, research shows.Where people live and the jobs they do are more likely to explain the differences, research shows.

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As President Trump claims that he is immune to COVID-19 and isolated reports emerge of reinfection, what is the truth about immunity to COVID-19?

Coronavirus reinfection cases: what we know so far – and the vital missing clues

“Long-Covid,” the lingering impact of the coronavirus infection that can sometimes lurk for months, appears to be affecting people in at least four differe“Long-Covid,” the lingering impact of the coronavirus infection that can sometimes lurk for months, appears to be affecting people in at least four differe

"Long-Covid" May Be At Least Four Different Syndromes, Says New Review | IFLScience

US remains country hardest hit by pandemic, making up roughly 20% of all virus-related fatalities and confirmed cases - Anadolu AgencyUS remains country hardest hit by pandemic, making up roughly 20% of all virus-related fatalities and confirmed cases - Anadolu Agency

COVID-19 deaths eclipse 1.1 million worldwide

In the absence of approved, effective treatments for COVID-19, some hospitals have been treating patients with severe COVID symptoms with blood plasma from recovering patients. The blood of recovered patients contains antibodies that act against the coronavirus. While plasma hasn't yet shown a benef

Antibodies Fade Quickly in Recovering COVID-19 Patients

Nine states reported a record tally of new coronavirus cases, as the total number of infections detected in the U.S. since the pandemic began ticked above 8 million. Nine states reported a record tally of new coronavirus cases, as the total number of infections detected in the U.S. since the pandemic began ticked above 8 million.

Confirmed Coronavirus Cases in U.S. Surpass 8 Million - WSJ

Plenty of research has been published recently about the potential link between a person's blood type and their COVID-19 risk. Here's what you need to know.Here's what doctors have to say about all the recent research.

The Link Between Blood Type and COVID-19 Risk, Explained | Health.com

New blood test predicts which COVID patients at severe risk Greater Kashmir | In the fight against novel coronavirus, scientists have developed a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form ofNew blood test predicts which COVID patients at severe risk Greater Kashmir | In the fight against novel coronavirus, scientists have developed a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of

New blood test predicts which COVID patients at severe risk | Greater Kashmir

Handful of case reports on reinfection with COVID-19 don’t necessarily mean that immunity is not occurringHandful of case reports on reinfection with COVID-19 don’t necessarily mean that immunity is not occurring

Coronavirus reinfection cases: Everything we know so far – and the vital missing clues - Surrey Live

A new study in the US has found that cancer patients who had Covid-19 were at a greater risk and had required more hospitalisation and intensive care.A new study in the US has found that cancer patients who had Covid-19 were at a greater risk and had required more hospitalisation and intensive care.

Cancer patients with Covid-19 at higher risk than others: Study - SCIENCE News

The study performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all Danish individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2 between 27 February 2020 and 30 July 2020, with a known ABO and RhD blood group, to determine the influence of common blood groups on virus susceptibility.The study performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all Danish individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2 between 27 February 2020 and 30 July 2020, with a known ABO and RhD blood group, to determine the influence of common blood groups on virus susceptibility.

Blood Group O Likely to Have Lower Risk of Coronavirus Infection, Says Study

The number of coronavirus cases in the United States surpassed 8 million on Friday as health officials from coast to coast scramble to contain the rising rate of infections.

The US has reached 8 million COVID-19 cases, and the pace of new infections signals a tough winter

Coronavirus cases are spiking in six election battleground states, potentially complicating voting. The U.S. on Friday surpassed 8 million COVID-19 cases in a new surge setting the country up forCoronavirus cases are spiking in six election battleground states, potentially complicating voting. The U.S. on Friday surpassed 8 million COVID-19 cases in a new surge setting the country up for

US records 8 million total virus cases; swing states' surge worries election officials | National News | richmond.com

India reported the first confirmed case of the coronavirus infection on 30 January 2020, 9 months later this pandemic is far from over. As the search for a vaccine continues, plasma therapy has emerged as a bankable option to treat COVID-19. What is Plasma Therapy?Plasma therapy has proven to be an India reported the first confirmed case of the coronavirus infection on 30 January 2020, 9 months later this pandemic is far from over. As the search for a vaccine continues, plasma therapy has emerged as a bankable option to treat COVID-19. What is Plasma Therapy?Plasma therapy has proven to be an

What is Plasma Therapy and how it helps in combating COVID-19?

In the past month, cases have gone down about 5% in California, while they have risen about 42% nationally. Its positivity rate is now half that of the national average.In the past month, cases have gone down about 5% in California, while they have risen about 42% nationally. Its positivity rate is now half that of the national average.

Coronavirus: California's cases stay flat despite national surge

Science News: Researchers have now claimed that antibody levels in the blood of Covid-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared theScience News: Researchers have now claimed that antibody levels in the blood of Covid-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared the

In recovering Covid-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly: Study - Times of India

Science News: Researchers have now claimed that antibody levels in the blood of Covid-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared the Researchers have now claimed that antibody levels in the blood of Covid-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared the virus and symptoms have subsided. If convalescent plasma is ultimately shown to have a clear benefit, then it needs to be collected during a specific window of time after recovery, the study, published in the journal 'mBio', reported.

In recovering Covid-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly: Study - Times of India

The United States has reported its highest one-day total since July, as experts say a dangerous autumn surg...

Coronavirus: US cases surge to highest levels since July, ten states see record infections

Florida’s official COVID-19 “positivity rate” is at odds with rates reported by the renowned tracker run by Johns Hopkins University. The official state rate is around 5 percent; Johns Hopkins says it’s closer to 12. As is common with statistics, data can be analyzed and interpreted in various, even contradictory, ways. Florida Sen. Linda Stewart […]

FL's COVID infection stats at odds with major national database | Florida Phoenix

Say these symptoms are more prevalent in people who had suffered from a mild infection of the virusSay these symptoms are more prevalent in people who had suffered from a mild infection of the virus

Researchers reveal ‘four long Covid syndromes’ as coronavirus after-effects - The Hindu BusinessLine

Coronavirus can be tricky: What was originally thought to be a respiratory virus seems to have wide-ranging effects on the human body, attacking the system of blood vessels that feeds the brain, heart, kidneys and liver. Those who recover may have long-lasting symptoms that endure far beyond the relatively circumscribed, temporary effects of the flu.A review of studies conducted by the UK National Institute for Health Research is the latest report to come to this conclusion. It warns that some coronavirus patients may experience "Long COVID," or symptoms that last for weeks or months, which can be plentiful and transient. "A common theme is that symptoms arise in one physiological system then abate, only for symptoms to arise in a different system," the NIHR report said. The title of the report—"Living With COVID-19"—has become a reality for many people worldwide. "The overwhelming message is that this is not a linear condition," Elaine Maxwell, lead author of the study, told the Financial Times. "Many [patients] suffer a rollercoaster of symptoms moving around the body, from which they do not recover."One respiratory specialist and member of the NIHR study group even likened it to the early days of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. "As we understood HIV infection better, we found out about all the different possible presentations of disease." he said in the FT. "Right now, as we try to define our terms, this feels like HIV research was then." That's because, to a large extent, scientists still don't understand why the virus behaves as it does, and why it behaves differently in different people.These are some of the possible "Long Covid" symptoms the NIHR scientists spotlighted in their report. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus. 1 Shortness of Breath A common symptom of COVID-19 is shortness of breath. In some people, this is caused by lung damage that can be fatal. In one study, 88% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients had visible lung damage six weeks after being discharged. The potentially good news is that it may be reversible: By 12 weeks, the number had fallen to 56%. But another study of hospitalized coronavirus patients found that a month after being discharged, more than 70% reported shortness of breath and 13.5% were still using oxygen at home.  2 Brain Fog According to a study published in the Lancet, 55% of people diagnosed with coronavirus have neurological symptoms three months after their diagnosis, such as difficulty concentrating or confusion (a.k.a. brain fog), personality changes, headaches and insomnia. 3 Heart Damage "Acute myocardial injury is the most commonly described cardiovascular complication in Covid19, occurring in 8–12% of all those discharged with heart failure and arrythmias," the report said. 4 Extreme Fatigue Fatigue is perhaps the most common effect of coronavirus infection. It was reported by 100% of patients participating in the COVID Symptom Tracker. And it can last: In another study of 143 people who had been hospitalized with COVID-19, 53% reported fatigue more than two months after their diagnosis. 5 Hair Loss Hair loss is a commonly reported symptom of coronavirus infection. Experts believe it's a temporary type of shedding known as telogen effluvium, which can be caused by stress, fever, illness, or weight loss—all of which can happen during a bout with the coronavirus. 6 Inability to Taste or Smell In one study published this summer in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 64% of COVID-19 patients surveyed reported a loss of smell or taste. A July survey by the CDC found that some people experienced it for weeks.  7 Mental Health Issues "Previous coronavirus infections have also been associated with high levels of emotional distress," the researchers noted. "A Canadian study of 117 people with SARS [sudden acute respiratory syndrome] found 17% had not returned to work one year later and 44% had used mental health services. A systematic review of the mental health of people with SARS concluded that in the early stages of recovery there is a fear for survival and fear of infecting others. Later concerns are around perceived stigmatization, reduced quality of life, and psychological/emotional distress. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were found in high proportions of survivors even as late as 51 months after the initial infection." 8 How to Stay Healthy As for yourself, do everything you can to prevent getting—and spreading—COVID-19 in the first place: Wear your face mask, get tested if you think you have coronavirus, avoid crowds (and bars, and house parties), practice social distancing, only run essential errands, wash your hands regularly, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.Coronavirus can be tricky: What was originally thought to be a respiratory virus seems to have wide-ranging effects on the human body, attacking the system of blood vessels that feeds the brain, heart, kidneys and liver. Those who recover may have long-lasting symptoms that endure far beyond the relatively circumscribed, temporary effects of the flu.A review of studies conducted by the UK National Institute for Health Research is the latest report to come to this conclusion. It warns that some coronavirus patients may experience "Long COVID," or symptoms that last for weeks or months, which can be plentiful and transient. "A common theme is that symptoms arise in one physiological system then abate, only for symptoms to arise in a different system," the NIHR report said. The title of the report—"Living With COVID-19"—has become a reality for many people worldwide. "The overwhelming message is that this is not a linear condition," Elaine Maxwell, lead author of the study, told the Financial Times. "Many [patients] suffer a rollercoaster of symptoms moving around the body, from which they do not recover."One respiratory specialist and member of the NIHR study group even likened it to the early days of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. "As we understood HIV infection better, we found out about all the different possible presentations of disease." he said in the FT. "Right now, as we try to define our terms, this feels like HIV research was then." That's because, to a large extent, scientists still don't understand why the virus behaves as it does, and why it behaves differently in different people.These are some of the possible "Long Covid" symptoms the NIHR scientists spotlighted in their report. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus. 1 Shortness of Breath A common symptom of COVID-19 is shortness of breath. In some people, this is caused by lung damage that can be fatal. In one study, 88% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients had visible lung damage six weeks after being discharged. The potentially good news is that it may be reversible: By 12 weeks, the number had fallen to 56%. But another study of hospitalized coronavirus patients found that a month after being discharged, more than 70% reported shortness of breath and 13.5% were still using oxygen at home.  2 Brain Fog According to a study published in the Lancet, 55% of people diagnosed with coronavirus have neurological symptoms three months after their diagnosis, such as difficulty concentrating or confusion (a.k.a. brain fog), personality changes, headaches and insomnia. 3 Heart Damage "Acute myocardial injury is the most commonly described cardiovascular complication in Covid19, occurring in 8–12% of all those discharged with heart failure and arrythmias," the report said. 4 Extreme Fatigue Fatigue is perhaps the most common effect of coronavirus infection. It was reported by 100% of patients participating in the COVID Symptom Tracker. And it can last: In another study of 143 people who had been hospitalized with COVID-19, 53% reported fatigue more than two months after their diagnosis. 5 Hair Loss Hair loss is a commonly reported symptom of coronavirus infection. Experts believe it's a temporary type of shedding known as telogen effluvium, which can be caused by stress, fever, illness, or weight loss—all of which can happen during a bout with the coronavirus. 6 Inability to Taste or Smell In one study published this summer in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 64% of COVID-19 patients surveyed reported a loss of smell or taste. A July survey by the CDC found that some people experienced it for weeks.  7 Mental Health Issues "Previous coronavirus infections have also been associated with high levels of emotional distress," the researchers noted. "A Canadian study of 117 people with SARS [sudden acute respiratory syndrome] found 17% had not returned to work one year later and 44% had used mental health services. A systematic review of the mental health of people with SARS concluded that in the early stages of recovery there is a fear for survival and fear of infecting others. Later concerns are around perceived stigmatization, reduced quality of life, and psychological/emotional distress. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were found in high proportions of survivors even as late as 51 months after the initial infection." 8 How to Stay Healthy As for yourself, do everything you can to prevent getting—and spreading—COVID-19 in the first place: Wear your face mask, get tested if you think you have coronavirus, avoid crowds (and bars, and house parties), practice social distancing, only run essential errands, wash your hands regularly, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

7 Signs You've Caught COVID From Which You May Never Recover

Dr Indeewar Kapila said the first wave of the pandemic had had a "significant" impact on staffDr Indeewar Kapila said the first wave of the pandemic had had a "significant" impact on staff

Coronavirus doctors 'extremely worried' about next few weeks of pandemic - MyLondon

Dr Indeewar Kapila said medics are "extremely worried" and bracing themselves for a difficult second wave.Dr Indeewar Kapila said medics are "extremely worried" and bracing themselves for a difficult second wave.

Covid-19: Hospital staff in North West 'bracing themselves' for second wave as intensive care admissions rise rapidly | ITV News

Could your blood type predict how sick you might get if you contract the coronavirus?Could your blood type predict how sick you might get if you contract the coronavirus?

Studies Suggest Certain Blood Types Less Susceptible To COVID-19 Infection, Length Of ICU Stay And Use Of Ventilator – CBS New York

Less than a month after the total number of coronvirus cases reached 7 million, the US has hit the next major milestone. The nation is now the only one in the world to have 8 million reported cases,... US News Summaries. | NewserMultiple states are dealing with surges

US Is First to 8M Cases

At the current rate of growth, the nation could set a record for new COVID-19 cases in a single week within the first few days of November.

COVID-19 cases in US grow at a speed not seen since July, the summer peak

COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations are increasing again with no sign of stopping, sparking fears that the fall and winter wave experts had warned about all year is already here. COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations are increasing again with no sign of stopping, sparking fears that the fall and winter wave experts had warned about all year is already here. 

COVID-19 surge prompts warnings that anticipated 'third wave' is now here | TheHill

COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations are increasing again with no sign of stopping, sparking fears that the fall and winter wave experts had warned about all year is already here. COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations are increasing again with no sign of stopping, sparking fears that the fall and winter wave experts had warned about all year is already here. 

COVID-19 surge prompts warnings that anticipated 'third wave' is now here | TheHill

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Your blood type could make you less likely to catch Covid-19 - what scientists are saying | Edinburgh News

Studies suggest that certain blood types may leave you more at risk of COVID-19. See what the science says so far—and why people with Type O still need masks. What you need to know about new research.

What You Need to Know About Your Blood Type and COVID-19 Risk

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